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The Kōyō Crochet Infinity Scarf

Updated: May 16, 2023



Autumn is rolling around and we can finally break out colder weather wardrobes and accessories. The Kōyō Crochet Infinity Scarf is a light-weight and graceful scarf crochet pattern for beginners that is perfect for the crisp autumn weather. Read on to find out the inspiration for this scarf and design process or scroll on down for the written pattern.

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Save it for Later

If you want to make the Solar Flare Crochet Cardigan don’t forget to save it for later! You can also find the links below for the inexpensive PDF patterns on Etsy and Ravelry:

Get the Ad Free, easy to follow, large print, printable PDF pattern on ETSY or RAVELRY.

〜PIN this pattern to your Pinterest boards for later HERE.

Add this pattern to your Ravelry queue HERE.


Hayley Templeman: Style Craft Special Aran | Teal (1062), Sage (1725) & Duck Egg (1820) | Approx. 207 meters: Teal = 66 meters, Sage = 75 meters, Duck Egg = 66 meters.

A Big Thank You

Before I get into the design process and yarn choices, I want to express a huge thank you to Lorraine Catterall, Hayley Templeman, Naomi Ahronson, Stephanie Phillips-Nunn and Sharon Lewis, the very talented group of crocheters who tested the Kōyō infinity scarf. I will share their work with you throughout this post so that you can see their projects and yarn choices.

Sharon Lewis : Knit & Purl Denim Yarn | Colour: Spruce | 130 grams (each skein is 50grams).

The Inspiration

Here in the Netherlands the weather is already starting to change. Once a week we need to sweep the falling leaves from the garden and the heat-wave has ended. It’s not quite cold enough for bulky winter scarves so I wanted to design a light-weight scarf that would be perfect for cooler autumn mornings. I always love the colour transitions of autumn leaves so I decided to use these colours in the sample piece. While I love the autumnal colours in my own scarf I also love how the testers put their own personal stamp on the pattern by using such a wide range of colours and colour combinations. I think that the Kōyō infinity scarf has worked up beautifully for each tester, making it a very versatile and customisable pattern!

Lorraine Catterall: Sublime Lustrous Extra-Fine DK | Mink (290), Saffron (293) & Teasel (296) | Approx. 202 meters.

Naming the Kōyō Infinity Scarf

The name for the Kōyō Infinity scarf is a little different from my other patterns. I wanted to continue with the autumn theme for the name and so it was also the autumn leaves that inspired me to use the Japanese word Kōyō . In Japanese the word Kōyō is often used to describe the mosaic carpet of leaves in shades of green, yellow, orange and red that roll southward through the archipelago of Japan in autumn.

Naomi Ahronson: King Cole Price Wise | Khaki (1742) & Brink (3021) | Approx. 241 meters

The Pattern Stitch

You might recognise the pattern stitch from the Kōyō infinity scarf and that is because I used the same stitch as the Solar Flare Cardigan (you can check it out here). I just love all the texture and character that this stitch adds to a project. It is also quite a simple stitch making it suitable for beginners. So based on all of this I feltl as though this pattern stitch was just asking to be used in more patterns! The Kōyō Infinity Scarf is the just second design that I will release using this stitch. Next on the agenda is a warm winter cardigan!

Stephanie Phillips-Nunn: Hayfield by Sirdar Bonus DK | Starling (0987) | Approx. 208 meters

The Yarn

The yarn I used for Kōyō infinity scarf is the same yarn brand (Durable Yarn – Cosy Fine) as I used for the Solar Flare Cardigan. Durable Yarn – Cosy Fine yarn is listed by the producer as a DK weight yarn but I am inclined to say that it is heavier than most DK (light) weight yarns. The testers for this scarf also had the same feedback when they made their gauge swatches & recommend going up a hook size or using Aran (medium) instead. Of course this is a scarf and so gauge is not extremely important but nonetheless you don’t want your scarf to end up much smaller than the sample piece! Be sure to read the section in the pattern on how to achieve gauge where I have included lots of tips and advice.

The Pattern

Save it for Later

If you want to make the Solar Flare Crochet Cardigan don’t forget to save it for later! You can also find the links below for the inexpensive PDF patterns on Etsy and Ravelry:

Get the Ad Free, easy to follow, large print, printable PDF pattern on ETSY or RAVELRY.

〜PIN this pattern to your Pinterest boards for later HERE.

Add this pattern to your Ravelry queue HERE.

Scroll down for the free pattern.

Materials

Terminology: American (US)

Skill level: Beginner

Skill requirements:Mattress Stitch for seaming

Required materials: Yarn, hook, scissors and a blunt yarn or tapestry needle

Hook Size: 4.5mm / US 7 (or as needed to meet gauge)

Sizing: One size

Suggested Yarn: The sample piece used Dark Olive (2149), (Brick 2239) & Ochre (2182). This yarn is a heavy DK and is close to the next yarn weight: Aran | Worsted | Medium weight yarn.

Yarn weight: 3 or Fine (US) | DK or 8ply (UK) | 8ply (AUS), or 4 or Medium (US) | Worsted or 10ply (UK) | 10ply (AUS)

Gauge: 13 stitches and 8 rows in each 10cm x 10cm (4” x 4”). To make a gauge swatch follow the pattern stitch until you have a swatch slightly larger than each 10cm x 10cm (4” x 4”). As this is a pattern stitch the gauge is approximate: meeting exact gauge is not strictly necessary for this project.

Yarn quantities: 130grams / 300meters (approximate). If using three colours more yarn is needed for the two colours which will also be used for the edging.

Measurements: 130cm (51”) length before seaming | 19cm (7 ½”) width including border.

Resources

Mattress Stitch

You can watch a video tutorial for the mattress stitch from Heart Hook Home’s You Tube channel at the following link: https://youtu.be/G2ihsbNpZto

Stitches

fc foundation chain

sk skip a stitch

St(s) stitch(es)

sl st slip stitch

ch chain

hbDc herringbone double crochet

hbDcFlo herringbone double crochet front loop only

tr treble crochet

rep repeat

Hbdc: Yarn over, insert hook into the stitch & pull up a loop. Pull the third loop through the second loop on the hook. You now have two loops on the hook. Yarn over and pull through the first loop. Yarn over and pull through the last two loops.

Tr: Yarn over twice, insert hook into stitch & pull up a loop, you now have 4 loops on your hook. Yarn over pull through the 1st 2 loops on the hook, yarn over pull through next 2 loops, yarn over and pull through the last 2 loops on the hook.

Multiples: The pattern stitch is a multiple of 2sts + 1st and 2sts for the foundation chain. The edging is a multiple of 10sts.

Making a Gauge Swatch


Making a gauge swatch is important for determining that the Infinity Scarf will work up in the correct size. However, gauge does not need to be exact so small variations are not problematic. Make sure to make a swatch before you begin your project and adjust your hook size or yarn weight as needed.

To make a gauge swatch follow the pattern stitch until you have a swatch that is larger than 10cm x 10cm (4” x 4”). Your swatch should follow the foundation chain & rows 1, 2, 3, etc onwards until your swatch is large enough.

A gauge swatch should be larger than 10cm x 10cm (4” x 4”) to accurately determine your tension. This is because the foundation chain and first few rows tend to be slightly tighter and should not be used to measure gauge.

If you have roughly the correct number of stitches per cm/ inch but the rows do not match the sample gauge then you canadjust the height of your stitches. If you have too many rows your stitches are not tall enough. If you have too few rows your stitches are too tall. When you insert the hook to make a new stitch, draw up a little more yarn if your stitches are not tall enough or draw up less yarn if your stitches are too tall.

If your swatch has more stitches than the pattern gauge then make a second swatch with a larger hook.

If your swatch has significantly more stitches and rows than the pattern gauge then the yarn you are using may not be heavy enough. Try using a heavier weigh yarn or use the same yarn and add more stitches to the foundation chain. Add in multiples of 10, for example instead of chain 181, chain 191 or 201 etc. You can also make an extra repeat of rows 5 – 8 to ensure the scarf is wide enough.

If your swatch has less stitches than the pattern gauge then make a second swatch with a smaller hook.

If your swatch has significantly less stitches and rows than the pattern gauge then the yarn you are using may be too heavy Try using a lighter weighted yarn or use the same yarn and reduce the amount of stitches in the foundation chain in multiples of 10. For example, instead of 181 chain 171, 161, 151 etc.

Pattern Stitch Notes

The Turning Chain and Turning Chain Stitch

The turning chain at the beginning of each row counts as a herringbone double crochet.

This means you must not make the next stitch in the turning chain stitch (the stitch where the turning chain is coming from).

You must also finish the row by making the last herringbone double crochet into the 3rd stitch of the turning chain.

Infinity Scarf – Main Panel

Make x 1 panel

FC Using first colour, ch 181.

R 1 HbDc in 4th chain from hook. HbDc in every ch to the end of the row, turn. (179 sts)

R2 Ch4, sk1, *hbDcFlo, ch1, sk1; Rep from * to the end of the row. Make the last stitch of the row a hbDc into the 3rd chain of the turning chain, turn. (90 sts)

R3 Ch4 (counts as hbDc and ch1), *sk the ch1-space, hbDcFlo into the next stitch, ch1; Rep from * to the end of the row. Make the last stitch of the row a hbDc into the 3rd chain of the turning chain, turn. (90 sts)

R4 Ch3, *hbDc in ch1-space, hbDc in next stitch; Rep from * to last chain space. Make a hbDc into the last chain space and make the last hbDc of the row into the 3rd chain of the turning chain, turn. (179 sts)

R5 Yarn on in next colour. Ch3, hbDcFlo in each stitch to the end of the row. Make the last stitch of the row a hbDc into the 3rd chain of the turning chain, turn. (179 sts)

R6 Ch4 (counts as hbDc and ch1), sk1, *hbDcFlo, ch1, sk1; Rep from * to the end of the row. Make the last stitch of the row a hbDc into the 3rd chain of the turning chain, turn (90 sts)

R7 Ch4 (counts as hbDc and ch1), *sk the ch1-space, hbDcFlo into the next stitch, ch1; Rep from * to the end of the row. Make the last stitch of the row a hbDc into the 3rd chain of the turning chain, turn. (90 sts)

R8 Ch3, *hbDc in chain space, hbDc in next stitch; Rep from * to last chain space. Make a hbDc into the last chain space and make the last stitch of the row a hbDc into 3rd chain of the turning chain. (179 sts).

R9 – R 12 If using three colours change to third colour. Repeat rows 5 – 8. Yarn off and weave in all loose ends.

Tip

When changing colour leave a long tail when you yarn off the colour in use. The long tails left of each colour can be used to sew the scarf together when seaming.

Infinity Scarf Assembly

Seaming the panel

Lay the panel down on a flat surface with the right-side facing up. The right-side is the side where there is no line running through middle of the arrow motif:

Bring both ends of the panel together. Using some yarn from the first colour use the mattress seam stitch to sew the first part of the panel together.

Using your second yarn colour sew the middle of the panel together.

Using the third colour sew the last part of the panel together. Sew in your loose ends.


The Edging

Peacock Stitch

The peacock stitch is used to make large fans as edging on each side of the panel you have just sewn together into a loop.

Round 1: Yarn onto one side of the panel beside the seam. Ch1, 1sc into same stitch, *sk 4 sts, 7tr into next st, sk4, 1sc into next stitch*; Rep from * to the last 4 sts. Close the round by slip stitching to the first sc of the round. Yarn off and weave in loose ends.

Round 2: Yarn onto the second side of the panel and repeat round 1.

Alternative edging: To create an edging with more fans you can omit the single crochet between each fan.

Ch1, 1sc into same stitch, *sk 4 sts, 7tr into next st*; Rep from * to the last 4 sts. Close the round by slip stitching to the first sc of the round. Yarn off and weave in loose ends.

*See the sample scarf of Sharon Lewis as an example of the alternative edging

Sharon Lewis – Alternative edging

I hope you have enjoyed making the Kōyō Crochet Infinity Scarf as much I did designing it. I would love to see your finished pieces.. you can share them with me here:

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If you have any questions or feedback I am always happy to hear from you. You can find my contact details on my contact page by clicking here.

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